Whole Larder Love » Grow. Gather. Hunt. Cook.

taste that pea-ness

Wow Spring has come and gone, and as a result we’ve cropped bags of peas and beans. In early spring we were super excited about the future crop of peas, we were a bit naughty and often nibbled on the young shoots on the pea bushes. They taste very much like peas in fact I like to hand some fresh leaves to a newbie, and ask them if they can taste the pea-ness flavour. Sometimes they agree that the pea-ness flavour is a winner. Sometime they slap me in the face for using foul language.

We’ve cropped most of the season’s crop, the rest we podded and froze and bagged in 1 cup portions. The broad beans (farva) we’ve eat like crazy this time of year. A lot of Aussies don’t know the best way to eat this little spring gem. I don’t care really, as I’m often gifted with unwanted beans!!!!

It’s officially summer. But hell, you wouldn’t know it. It’s currently 8.1 degrees and raining. I was going to walk the river with the fly rod this morning but I might leave it for another time.

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  • December 4, 2012 - 10:39 pm

    Margaret Hogan - I made broad bean dip last week. Boiled them in a little water. Peeled them. Pureed them with a slug of olive oil and a spoon or two of the cooking water. Pan fried a bit of chopped garlic, rosemary and pancetta. Added that. P&S. A little grating of parmo. Yummo.ReplyCancel

  • December 4, 2012 - 10:41 pm

    Jackson Malley - do you have any use for the outer casing other than compost?ReplyCancel

  • December 4, 2012 - 10:48 pm

    Michelle Frantom - We’ve had a similar strange start to summer here on the south coast of West Oz – it keeps raing, for which I am very grateful. If this is climate change – bring on the wetter summers, but I wouldn’t want it any hotter!ReplyCancel

  • December 4, 2012 - 10:50 pm

    Caleb Cluff - Taste that pea-ness? Rohan! Really?ReplyCancel

  • December 4, 2012 - 11:33 pm

    Allilau - Love that pea-ness greenery and those young shoots too! I love to stir fry the shoots Asian style with garlic, salt & sesame oil! It’s a lovely way to get all those yummy greens into my gob! As for the broad beans and peas, I hear ya! Minted peas with butter and lettuce (with a touch of bacon) is my ultimate go to… :) ReplyCancel

  • December 5, 2012 - 12:00 am

    Skye - Our peas are just starting to “pea” lol. One of our plants is only 10cm tall and had 4 pods almost the same length on it.. i had to pick them and my 5 year old ( who hates veggies) ate every single pea from inside the pod, he told me they were super sweet, better than lollies!ReplyCancel

    • December 5, 2012 - 12:11 am

      rohan - Same with my girls, when they ‘help’ podding the peas they eat plenty raw!!! So sweet. Snack foodReplyCancel

  • December 5, 2012 - 12:01 am

    Inkblot - I’ll bite, so to speak. What’s the best way to eat these little Spring gems?ReplyCancel

    • December 5, 2012 - 12:10 am

      rohan - Podded, then blanched for a few minutes, and peel off the bitter skin to expose the delicious green bean. Toss it with about rough tbsp of fresh tarragon, a little mint, a squeeze of lemon juice and a generous grate of peccorino. Spring bean salad.ReplyCancel

      • December 10, 2012 - 1:36 am

        Inkblot - Well, thank you for that. I’ll give it a shot.ReplyCancel

  • December 5, 2012 - 1:07 am

    Lucy - Pea-ness…hehehe. Thanks for the mid-week chuckle.
    I love broadbeans mushed on some good toast with some lemon and black pepper.ReplyCancel

  • December 5, 2012 - 2:03 am

    jen - Our peas were hammered by fierce blackbirds here in North Canterbury NZ..but they didn’t get the broad beans, we’re loving them with the last of our garlic, new basil and the last of the leeks.And then the parmesan.ReplyCancel

  • December 5, 2012 - 3:07 am

    Katie - Ha! What an excellent farmer joke. My boyfriend will probably never stop using that one.

    I miss peas and especially favas, which I’ve never seen out of a few weeks in the spring here. Last year my plants only produced a handful of beans; hopefully I’ll have enough to save some next year.ReplyCancel

  • December 5, 2012 - 4:46 am

    Sue - Have to confess that one slipped through to the keeper first time around – must need a holiday :-)
    We have been enjoying a bumper crop of peas this year and yep our kids can be seen scoffing them and the snow peas straight from the vines.ReplyCancel

  • December 5, 2012 - 8:18 am

    Donna - The joy of growing your own broad beans is you can pick them while the are young and tender. No need to peel. I eat small ones podded straight from the plant when I’m mooching around the garden.ReplyCancel

  • December 5, 2012 - 9:29 am

    Chris - Cool pea ness for ever we have need the rain here at High Range and the cool change good for the forge take care.
    ChristopherReplyCancel

  • December 5, 2012 - 10:39 am

    Rubén B - Here we are in winter time. Our bees are handling with the -1 degrees in the night, keeping their warm in a bee-ball.ReplyCancel

  • December 6, 2012 - 9:00 am

    Jason - I reckon broad beans are better then peas. I also eat the broadbean tips, just like you mentioned about the peas shoots! They are so good.ReplyCancel

  • December 6, 2012 - 11:35 am

    Alicia - I have been ‘gifted’ with broad beans from two people this year. They made salad and dip. They are beautiful when young and small. I find it very hard to get many peas inside, they are just too tempting and delicious while hanging out washing or going for a garden stroll.ReplyCancel

  • December 7, 2012 - 5:10 am

    tiffany - ah what a great crop! :) i had a army of snails munching on my lot of peas then came the powdery mildew. bother! broad beans have stopped cropping, i had a sick broad bean plant with rust :/ that has just died off, should really pick em, cook em and eat em. .. might go save em the misery of the heatwave due tomorrow.

    pea-ness is my favourite colour… oh now i get the joke.. funny!ReplyCancel

  • December 7, 2012 - 6:47 am

    Paul - The Kind Little Blogger - The broad beans went insane at our community garden this year. Pity I didn’t get creative with ‘em. But hey, I made plenty of felafel. :) ReplyCancel

  • December 7, 2012 - 10:44 am

    Katerina - Hello
    Here in Greece one of the ways we eat broad beans is whole with the outer shell with tomato paste. Sorry for bad English i wish you understand.
    I love your blog and you philosophy for life.

    Katerina FF’
    GreeceReplyCancel

    • December 10, 2012 - 1:03 am

      rohan - Thanks Katerina, I like them that way too! Especially with younger beansReplyCancel

  • December 7, 2012 - 6:30 pm

    Adam - I love fresh fava beans! I wait every year until I can get them fresh so I can make the following:

    You’ll need:
    -Pasta. You can make it with whatever you’d like, but I prefer linguine. As an alternate I would suggest tagliatelle, spaghetti, fettuccine, or just chop your sheets up into long vaguely triangular ribbons.
    -Fava beans (preferred, but can peas as an alternate)
    -Cippollini onions, halved or quartered depending on how large they are. (may use any sort of sweet onion but, because of the size, cippollinis are preferred and make a better presentation)
    -Guanciale, cut into baton. You can use pancetta, but it won’t be as good.
    -Salt, pepper, parmesan, butter, maybe some thyme

    -Roll out some fresh pasta and cut into linguine
    -Get a big pot of water going for the pasta, and a smaller pot to blanch the beans
    -Blanch the beans when ever in the process is convenient for you and set to the side.
    -Get a pan hot, toss the baton of guanciale in and cook until crisp on the outside and chewy inside. Leave the rendered pork fat in the pan and lower the heat to medium to medium low depending on your stove.
    -Once the pan is not as hot, throw the cippollini onions in there and let the cut sides brown and caramelize a little in the fat.
    -Turn the heat up on the pan with the onions, throw the beans and the guanciale back in the pan to warm again, add thyme or rosemary if you’re using it.
    -Cook your pasta in the big pot and when done, throw into the pan with the other components and toss, to coat everything in the pork fat. Depending on how lean your guanciale is you may need to mount with a little butter.
    -Plate the portions, salt and pepper to taste, shave some parmesan on top.

    Very simple and relies very much on the quality and texture of all the components. This dish, more than any other, is my celebration of spring.ReplyCancel

    • December 10, 2012 - 1:02 am

      rohan - I’m so going to try this! Thanks for sharing!ReplyCancel

  • December 8, 2012 - 12:36 am

    mat - i love a good peaReplyCancel

  • December 10, 2012 - 5:03 am

    Y - Awesome picture. Love love love peas. Currently I’m eating mostly snow peas and sugar snaps.ReplyCancel

    • December 10, 2012 - 10:02 am

      rohan - I grew sugar snaps last year….but forgot to plant them this year. They have to be the sweetest little pea’s around! Love them!ReplyCancel

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